Monday, February 12, 2018

The Bore-ing Back-cut…

The Bore-ing Back-cut…
by Tim Ard, Forest Applications Training, Inc.


Once you have completed the first four areas of information on your felling plan it is time to choose a back cut to fall the tree. You may choose to simply start from the back of the tree and cut to your holding wood/hinge or you might bore-cut through the tree, set up your hinge then cut backwards to release the tree. Yes, there are several other configurations of cuts that could be made to conclude the process. You could cut the good side, then the bad side, from back to hinge or hinge to back. You could bore and circle the tree with the back cut. But, what is or are the advantage(s) of a bore-cut over the simple back cut?

When asked the question of the advantages of the bore-cut I usually explain that the only negative to the bore-cut, if it is one, is the understanding of the reactive forces, especially the one of kickback. Really, if you understand that reaction, there are no negatives, only positives. Knowing how to begin the cut with the lower portion of the bar tip and quickly burying the tip in the process, eliminates the issue when you think about it. So, let’s list some positives…

  1. It reduces the chances of the tree trunk barber-chairing in heavy forward lean.
  2. Allows for a planned hinge/holding wood dimension to be better achieved. 
  3. Makes it possible to cut larger trees with multiple position (side to side) cuts.
  4. Improves capabilities of using a shorter saw bar length on larger trees.
  5. In smaller back leaning trees it gives the ability to place wedges before setback.
  6. Controls the release of the tree when there may be widow makers or broken tops.
  7. Gives more escape time from trees with vine issues.
  8. Offers better footing and escape from trees in steep or slippery terrain.
  9. Reduces fiber pull on the stump by allowing more accurate hinge completion.
  10. It offers the ability to locate hollows and rot areas in the tree trunk.
  11. Enables better controlled release of the tree should there be traffic or people issues.
  12. Eliminates some issues with tops swaying or wind effecting the release of a tree.

There are probably more as I sit and think and there are also several advantages working with bore-cuts on horizontal storm damaged trees. The Bore-Cut is not so boring… but very useful and productive.

Check out other articles on www.ForestApps.com and www.ForestApps.Blogspot.com And if you are interested in finding out more of having Forest Applications Training, Inc. take part in your chainsaw training programs or presentations contact us at info@ForestApps.com .


Copyright 2018 Forest Applications Training, Inc.

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Saw Savvy...

Saw Savvy
By Tim Ard, Forest Applications Training, Inc. 

In workshops all across the country one thing seems to be similar.  Participants at some point in the workshop always say “My saw doesn’t start and run like yours”. 
Over the years I have operated many model saws and other two-cycle machines of several brands. I can honestly say in my findings that all of them, if understood and maintained properly, usually will outwork this operator. I’ve learned most issues arise from operator controls and maintenance or lack there of.  It’s not to say the operator causes every issue but most of the time a lack of attention and or understanding is a major contributor. 

I have a workshop available that covers some of these aspects in a unique tear down and inspection process.  I want to highlight a few of the very important areas with this writing. 

A two-cycle engine is simply an air pump. It needs air flow to mix with fuel, compression and spark to convert this mixture to usable energy. The air filter is important in maintaining this air flow. Fuel mixed properly, gasoline with lubrication, adjusted to the right amount of air is critical to efficient run, power and longevity. Engine compression creates power by manipulating the air and fuel flow. Compressing, squeezing and confining to make sure the power is harnessed and carried to the crankshaft and on to the crankshaft attachment. Ignition spark divides the intake from the exhaust. Exploding at the perfect time to turn fuel and air into burned gases. Efficient combustion is the by product of a well designed and tuned engine. If the operator doesn’t have a basic understanding of these principles it’s difficult to maintain and operate to the equipment’s potential. 

So in the Troubleshooting Workshop we look at how the air filter may restrict air flow. How proper fuel mix can make or break an engine. How lubrication is utilized and how the carburetor is adjusted and is susceptible to dirt, water and too much oil. What causes an engine to seize up.  What external attachments like bar and saw chain can effect.  How can starting procedures effect the run and life of the equipment. What is a fast idle position? 

The workshop can be accomplished at your location. Open to16 participants and requires 4hours of class time. It is all hands-on for the attendees, intertwined with lecture. A chainsaw operator with a little Saw Savvy from a Trouble Shooting Workshop will be an operator with less equipment issues, better safety awareness and improved productivity. 

The author is President and Lead Instructor for Forest Applications Training Inc. a company specializing in safety, education and applications of the ChainSaw. More information can be acquired at www.ForestApps.com or email info@ForestApps.com  We would appreciate the opportunity to present to you and your organization.

©️2018 Forest Applications Training Inc.